The 6 best places to retire in the UK

The 6 best places to retire in the UK

author: Sarah Neate

By Sarah Neate

 Considering a move after retirement? Turns out you’re not alone. survey by the Interactive Investor showed that a quarter of non-retired respondents are planning to move once they retire and cash in their pension 

Overall, most people plan to move within the UK whilst some are still considering retirement overseas. One in 12 have plans to downsize, whilst one in ten want to move to another part of the UK. 

There are many factors that go into choosing the best place to retire, including where your friends and family are and the proximity to leisure opportunities. But two important factors are also location and affordability.  

We’ve rounded up six top picks for retirement across the UK. These places are chosen based on their combination of affordability, low crime rates, accessibility and other factors that may make them appealing. 

1. County Durham  

County Durham is one of the top places for retirement. It has super-affordable housing options, relatively low crime rates (16th lowest in the UK), incredible architecture and beautiful green scenery.  

Its northern location means you might not get the nicest weather (compared to the south coast), but County Durham will make up for it by offering quaint towns, amazing castles and lovely gardens.  

The average price of a house in this area is a very reasonable £153,402 

2. Cumbria  

Cumbria boasts picturesque countryside, cute villages and very low crime rates (3rd lowest in the UK).  

If you retire to Cumbria, you’ll be rewarded with spectacular views of lakes and mountains, a relaxing lifestyle and a low cost of living. You can choose between cute villages and towns with a little more hustle and bustle, like Grange Over Sands. If not, you can retire to the total tranquillity of the countryside.  

The average price for a house in this area is £202,037. 

3. Lincolnshire 

Lincolnshire is the second-largest county in the UK. Its accessible to the city, countryside and the coast and has low crime rates (12th lowest in the UK). It’s also home to its own purpose-built retirement village 

Lincolnshire’s maritime climate brings cool summers and warm winters. There’s a cathedral, a castle and a medieval bishop’s palace. There’s also Burton Waters, which is home to lots of speciality shops and restaurants.  

The average price for a house in this area is £204,345 

4. Staffordshire  

Staffordshire is well connected by great train lines, and the city of Stafford is right next to the M6. Crime rates are reasonable, they’re 21st lowest in the UK. 

There’s large shopping centres, markets and restaurants around Stafford, as well as National Trust gardens, cafes and  quaint pubs. If you are a music lover, Staffordshire also hosts its own music festival every year. 

The average price for a house in this area is £218,234. 

5. Suffolk  

Suffolk is slightly more on the expensive side in terms of property prices, but if you’re looking for a stunning coastline, then it might be the place for you. It also has the 11th lowest crime rate in the UK.  

As well as its beautiful coast, Suffolk boasts incredible countryside with lots of picturesque villages. Its well connected and hosts multiple arts and entertainment festivals each year. 

The average price for a house in this area is £295,780. 

6. York  

A little more expensive again, York is a charming ancient town with historic streetsIt’s close to the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors, as well as being well-connected with a train station in the city centre.  

There are many residential areas with amenities on the doorstep meaning you don’t need to venture far to get everything you need.  

York is steeped in history. You can visit York Minster, York National Railway Museum, Clifford’s Tower and JORVIViking Centre. And don’t forget the famous York Christmas Market.    

The average price for a house in this area is £300,201. 

Find out how to save for your retirement and the best places to keep your money. 

Disclaimer: All information and links are correct at the time of publishing.

author: Sarah Neate

By Sarah Neate

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