Is your street lacking in community spirit?


Is your street lacking in community spirit?

Community spirit; it’s something we so often read is lacking. In fact, there are some who believe it started to vanish after World War II and has been in rapid decline since then.

But then there are those who think that community spirit is very much in evidence where they live.

Rural neighbourhoods

If you live in the country you could consider yourself lucky as that’s where community spirit is considered to be strongest by the people who live there. Nearly two-fifths of respondents who reside in rural areas think there’s a degree of community spirit in their neighbourhood, according to a new poll carried out on our behalf*.

The same cannot be said for those living in suburbia. Just over half of people who live in residential suburban areas claim there is a sense of community spirit to be felt there.

In good times and bad

While nearly half of respondents from the countryside claim that they encounter community spirit ‘all of the time’ where they live, this is not the case for the rest of the UK. In fact, nearly two-fifths of Brits say there is no community spirit at all where they live.

Meanwhile, some respondents suggest that it takes an event – either good or bad – to bring their community together. Nearly a quarter say that there has been community spirit where they live during recent occasions of national celebration, like the Olympics and Diamond Jubilee. Nearly one in five say the same has been true when their neighbourhood experienced a crisis, such as a storm or flood.

The benefits of community ties

There is something to be said for preserving a sense of community spirit – and not just when there’s something to celebrate. For example, if you have a good sense of community in your street, you might be able to pull together to get things done. This could include improving the appearance of the area, or organising charitable events like street parties or garden walk-abouts.

Another advantage of community spirit might be that people look out for each other more. If you’re friendly with your neighbours, you can ask them to keep an eye on your home when you go away, for instance, which will provide you with peace of mind.

*OnePoll questioned a nationally representative sample of 2,000 adults aged 18 and over between 24th July and 31st July 2014, of whom 620 were Scottish residents.